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From the writers of 2 Fast 2 Furious and the director of Taken, Overdrive is a fast-paced crime story, about two brothers and legendary car thieves Andrew (Scott Eastwood) and Garrett (Freddie Thorp). They find themselves in trouble when they attempt to steal from notorious crime boss Jacomo Morier. In order to win back their freedom, they must steal Morier’s sworn enemy’s priced car. They enlist the service of two ladies (Ana de Armas & Gaia Weiss) for this daring heist but turned out to be more dangerous than they look. The team has one week to put the plan in motion, steal the car, and make their escape or lose everything, including their lives.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXk9S9cwsEg
It’s easy to discard it as one of those regular entry  in the “one-last-job-before-I-go-legit” genre, where someone close to the lead gets maimed or killed. The lead in turn is finds himself in a dire situation with no means of escape, only for a literal deus ex machina to drop at the most convenient moment. The mere fact that it is written by the writers of Fast and Furious gives a near sense of deja-vu. And just when you think you know what happens next, it negotiates another bend. Yes, it is this sense of adventure that defines the movie. If anything, those elaborate car chases through exotic locales would distract you from the expected inanity.
If you love classic cars and shows like Top Gear and The Grand TourOverdrive is sure to blow you away with its selection of choicest cars in modern history.  “If this film had received a proper American theatrical release sometime in the late summer, instead being given a token release in theatres the same day it arrives on VOD in the early fall, it might have been able to have a mildly successful time at the box office and helped to move Mr. Eastwood closer to the level of stardom his dad started to achieve a half-century earlier. But, alas, the film will have to find its audience through word of mouth and dumb luck, and that’s a shame. It deserved better.”
Source: Rolling Stone